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              l83 wd 羅茨鼓風機:L8-U3-P1 英語流利說 8-3-1 懂你英語 Level8 Unit3 Part1:Evolving Our Bodies

                英語流利說 Level8 Unit3 Part1:Evolving Our Bodies

                Juan Enriquez: What will humans look like in 100 years?

                TEDSummit 15:45 Posted?November 2020

                Here’s a question that matters.

                Right? Because?we’re beginning to get all the tools together to evolve ourselves.?

                And we can evolve bacteria and we can evolve plants and we can evolve animals,?

                and we’re now reaching a point where we really have to ask, is it really ethical and do we want to evolve human beings

                And as you’re thinking about that, let me talk about that in the context of prosthetics, prosthetics past, present, future.

                So this is the iron hand that belonged to one of the German counts.?

                Loved to fight, lost his arm in one of these battles.?

                No problem, he just made a suit of armor, put it on, perfect prosthetic.?

                That’s where the concept of ruling with an iron fist comes from.?

                And of course these prosthetics have been getting more and more useful, more and more modern. You can hold soft-boiled eggs.?

                You can have all types of controls, and as you’re thinking about that,?

                there are wonderful people like Hugh Herr who have been building absolutely extraordinary prosthetics.?

                So the wonderful Aimee Mullins will go out and say, how tall do I want to be tonight

                Or he will say what type of cliff do I want to climb

                Or does somebody want to run a marathon, or does somebody want to ballroom dance

                And as you adapt these things, the interesting thing about prosthetics is they’ve been coming inside the body.?

                So these external prosthetics have now become artificial knees. They’ve become artificial hips.?

                And then they’ve evolved further to become not just nice to have but essential to have.

                So when you’re talking about a heart pacemaker as a prosthetic,?

                you’re talking about something that isn’t just, ” I’m missing my leg,”

                ?it’s, “if I don’t have this, I can die.”?

                And at that point, a prosthetic becomes a symbiotic relationship with the human body.?

                How have prosthetics evolved over time? They’ve become more customizable and necessary.

                - pacemakers

                Why does?Enriquez?believe prosthetics have the common ethical issue? They have the ability to?radically change the human body.

                A symbiotic relationship is one in?which …both sides depend on each other for survival.

                (1) This is the iron hand that belonged to one of the German counts.?

                (2) He loved to fight, lost his arm in one of these battles.?

                (3) It wasn’t a problem, he just made a suit of armor, put it on, perfect prosthetic.?

                (4) That’s where the concept of ruling with an iron fist comes from.?

                - They allowed people to replace missing limbs.

                - Whether they should use technology to evolve the human species.

                The interesting thing about prosthetics is that?as you adapt them, they start coming inside the body.?So these external prosthetics have now become artificial knees. They’ve become artificial hips. And then they’ve evolved further to become not just nice to have but essential to have.

                (1)The interesting thing about prosthetics is they’ve been coming inside the body.

                (2)So these external prosthetics have now become artificial knees.

                (3)They’ve become artificial hips.

                (4)And then they’ve evolved further to become not just nice to have but essential to have.

                And four of the smartest people that I’ve ever met — Ed Boyden, Hugh Herr, Joe Jacobson, Bob Lander — are working on a Center for Extreme Bionics.?

                And the interesting thing of what you’re seeing here is these prosthetics now get integrated into the bone. They get integrated into the skin. They get integrated into the muscle.?

                And one of the other sides of Ed is he’s been thinking about how to connect the brain using light or other mechanisms directly to things like these prosthetics.?

                And if you can do that, then you can begin changing fundamental aspects of humanity.?

                So how quickly you react to something depends on the diameter of a nerve.?

                And of course, if you have nerves that are external or prosthetic, say with light or liquid metal,?

                then you can increase that diameter and you could even increase it theoretically to the point where,?

                as long as you could see the muzzle flash, you could step out of the way of a bullet.?

                Those are the order of magnitude of changes you’re talking about.

                This is a fourth sort of level of prosthetics. These are Phonak hearing aids,?

                and the reason why these are so interesting is because they?cross the threshold from where prosthetics are something for somebody who is “disabled”

                and they become something that somebody who is “normal” might want to actually have,?

                because what this prosthetic does, which is really interesting, is not only does it help you?hear,

                you can?focus your hearing, so it can hear the conversation going on over there.

                You can have superhearing. You can have hearing in 360 degrees. You can have white noise. You can record, and oh, by the way, they also put a phone into this.?

                So this functions as your hearing aid and also as your phone.?

                And at that point, somebody might actually want to have a prosthetic voluntarily.

                All of these thousands of loosely?connected?little pieces are coming?together,

                and it’s about time we ask the question, how do we want to?evolve?human beings?over?the next century or two?

                And for that we turn to a great philosopher?

                who was a very smart man despite being a Yankee fan.

                And Yogi Berra used to say, of course, that it’s very tough to make predictions, especially about the future.

                How can?prosthetic nerves affect help people to react things? They can be designed to optimize human reaction speed.

                What role doesEnriquez think prosthetic will have in the future? He?isn’t completely sure about their role.

                When?prosthetics become this advanced, somebody might actually want to have one voluntarily.?

                We’re beginning to get all the tools together to evolve ourselves.

                The reason why these are so interesting is because they cross the threshold from where prosthetics are something for somebody who is “disabled” and they become something that somebody who is “normal” might want to actually have.

                - The wider the nerves, the faster humans can react to things.

                - It has the ability to make them superhuman.

                He’s been thinking about how to connect the brain using light or other mechanisms directly to things like these prosthetics. And if you can do that, then you can begin changing fundamental aspects of humanity.?

                That is the order of magnitude of changes you’re talking about.

                If you can do that, then you can begin changing fundamental aspects of humanity.

                All of these thousands of loosely?connected?little pieces are coming?together, and it’s about time we ask the question, how do we want to?evolve?human beings?over?the next century or two?

                Prosthetics have evolved further to become not just nice to have but essential to have.

                He thinks it’s very tough to make predictions about their future role.

                We can evolve bacteria and we can evolve plants and we can evolve animals, and we’re now reaching a point where we really have to ask, is it really ethical and do we want to evolve human beings?

                So instead of making a prediction about the future to begin with, let’s take what’s happening in the present with people like Tony Atala,?

                who is redesigning 30-some-odd organs.?

                And maybe the ultimate prosthetic isn’t having something external, titanium. Maybe the ultimate prosthetic is take your own gene code,?

                remake your own body parts, because that’s a whole lot more effective than any kind of a prosthetic.?

                But while you’re at it, then you can take the work of Craig Venter and Ham Smith.?

                And one of the things that we’ve been doing is trying to figure out how to reprogram cells.?

                And if you can reprogram a cell, then you can change the cells in those organs.?

                So if you can change the cells in those organs, maybe you make those organs more radiation-resistant. Maybe you make them absorb more oxygen. Maybe you make them more efficient to filter out stuff that you don’t want in your body.?

                And over the last few weeks, George Church has been in the news a lot?

                because he’s been talking about taking one of these programmable cells and inserting an entire human genome into that cell.?

                And once you can insert an entire human genome into a cell, then you begin to ask the question, would you want to enhance any of that genome

                Do you want to enhance a human body

                How would you want to enhance a human body

                Where is it ethical to enhance a human body and where is it not ethical to enhance a human body

                And all of a sudden, what we’re doing is we’ve got this multidimensional chess board?

                where we can change human genetics by using viruses to attack things like AIDS,?

                or we can change the gene code through gene therapy to do away with some hereditary diseases, or we can change the environment,?

                and change the expression of those genes in the epigenome and pass that on to the next generations.?

                And all of a?sudden, it’s?not just one little bit, it’s all these stacked little bits

                that?allow you to take little portions of it?until all the portions coming together?lead you to something that’s very different.

                Why is?Enriquez?concerned about genetic?prosthetics? They could change the human species radically but unpredictably.

                What is an example of a cell-based prosthetic? changing an organ to make it resistant radiation

                cellular and genetic modification.

                What is an example of genetic enhancement? Removing hereditary diseases.

                It’s important to remember that once you can insert?an entire human genome into a cell, then you begin to ask the question, would you want to enhance any of that genome

                And a lot of people are very scared by this stuff.?

                And it does sound scary, and there are risks to this stuff.?

                So why in the world would you ever want to do this stuff

                Why would we really want to alter the human body in a fundamental way?

                The answer lies in part with Lord Rees, astronomer royal of Great Britain.?

                And one of his favorite sayings is the universe is 100 percent malevolent.?

                So what does that mean? It means if you take any one of your bodies at random, drop it anywhere in the universe, drop it in space, you die.?

                Drop it on the Sun, you die. Drop it on the surface of Mercury, you die. Drop it near a supernova, you die.?

                But fortunately, it’s only about 80 percent effective.?

                So as a great physicist once said, there’s these little upstream eddies of biology that create order in this rapid torrent of entropy.?

                So as the universe dissipates energy, there’s these upstream eddies that create biological order.?

                Now, the problem with eddies is, they tend to disappear. They shift. They move in rivers.?

                And because of that, when an eddy shifts, when the Earth becomes a snowball, when the Earth becomes very hot, when the Earth gets hit by an asteroid,?

                when you have supervolcanoes, when you have solar flares,?

                when you have potentially extinction-level events like the next election —

                then all of a sudden, you can have periodic extinctions.?

                And by the way, that’s happened five times on Earth,?

                and therefore it is very likely that the human species on Earth is going to go extinct someday.?

                Not next week, not next month, maybe in November, but maybe 10,000 years after that.?

                As you’re thinking of the?consequence of that,

                if you believe that extinctions are common and natural and normal and?occur periodically,

                it becomes a moral?imperative to?diversify our species.

                And it becomes a moral imperative because?

                it’s going to be really hard to live on Mars if we don’t fundamentally modify the human body. Right

                You go from one cell, mom and dad coming together to make one cell, in a cascade to 10 trillion cells.?

                We don’t know, if you change the gravity substantially, if the same thing will happen to create your body.?

                We do know that if you expose our bodies as they currently are to a lot of radiation, we will die.?

                So as you’re thinking of that, you have to really redesign things just to get to Mars.?

                Forget about the moons of Neptune or Jupiter.?

                What does?Enriquez mean when he says the?universe is 100 percent malevolent? Humans can’t survive anywhere other than Earth.

                According to?Enriquez ?what is?a moral imperative for the human race? ?using prosthetics to enhance the human species

                If human beings want to live on Mars they will need to modify their bodies to survive.

                Maybe you make those organs more efficient to filter out stuff that you don’t want in your body.

                In order to develop an intrasolar civilization, humans would have to modify the body to allow long distance space travel.

                To become an intrasolar civilization, we’re going to have to create a Life Three civilization, and that looks very different from what we’ve got here.

                What does?Enriquez mean when he says the?universe is 100 percent malevolentHumans can’t survive anywhere other than Earth.

                It’ essential to human survival on other plants.

                If something is moral imperative, it …must be done for the humman good.

                We do know that if you expose our bodies as they currently are to a lot of radiation, we will die. So as you’re thinking of that, you have to really redesign things just to get to Mars.?

                And to borrow from Nikolai Kardashev, let’s think about life in a series of scales.?

                So Life One civilization is a civilization that begins to alter his or her looks.?

                And we’ve been doing that for thousands of years.?

                You’ve got tummy tucks and you’ve got this and you’ve got that.?

                You alter your looks and I’m told that not all of those alterations take place for medical reasons.

                Seems odd.

                A Life Two civilization is a different civilization.?

                A Life Two civilization alters fundamental aspects of the body.?

                So you put human growth hormone in, the person grows taller, or you put x in and the person gets fatter or loses metabolism or does a whole series of things,?

                but you’re altering the functions in a fundamental way.?

                To become an intrasolar civilization, we’re going to have to create a Life Three civilization,?

                and that looks very different from what we’ve got here.?

                Maybe you splice in Deinococcus radiodurans so that the cells can resplice after a lot of exposure to radiation.?

                Maybe you breathe by having oxygen flow through your blood instead of through your lungs.?

                But you’re talking about really radical redesigns?

                and one of the interesting things that’s happened in the last decade is we’ve discovered a whole lot of planets out there.?

                And some of them may be Earth-like.?

                The problem is, if we ever want to get to these planets, the fastest human objects

                ?– Juno and Voyager and the rest of this stuff — take tens of thousands of years to get from here to the nearest solar system.?

                So if you want to start exploring beaches somewhere else,?

                or you want to see two-sun sunsets, then you’re talking about something that is very different,?

                because you have to change the timescale and the body of humans in ways which may be absolutely unrecognizable.

                ?And that’s a Life Four civilization.

                How does Enriquez describe a life one civilization? People begin to modify their appearance.

                What the humans need to do if they want to reach distance planets and solar systems? change how human bodies age over long periods of time

                In order to develop an intrasolar civilization, humans would have to modify the body to allow long-distance space travel.

                In a life two civilization, people can use growth hormones to change fundamental aspects of the body.

                Why would we really want to alter the human body in a fundamental way?

                The problem is, if we ever want to get to these planets, the fastest human objects ?– Juno and Voyager and the rest of this stuff — take tens of thousands of years to get from here to the nearest solar system.

                As you’re thinking of the consequence of that,? if you believe that extinctions are common and natural and normal and occur periodically,? it becomes a moral imperative to diversify our species.

                How does Enriquez describe a life two civilization?Fundamental aspects of the human body can be genetically altered.

                - changing the human body on a cellular level

                To become an intrasolar civilization, we’re going to have to create a Life Three civilization, and that looks very different from what we’ve got here.

                Where is it ethical to enhance a human body and where is it not ethical to enhance a human body?

                With so many planets thousands of years away, humans would need to change how their bodies age.

                Mass exinctions have happened five times on Earth, and therefore it is very likely that the human species on Earth is going to go extinct someday.

                Once you can insert an entire human genome into a cell, then you begin to ask the question, would you want to enhance any of that genome?

                Now, we can’t even begin to?imagine?what that might look like,but?we’re?beginning?to get?glimpses?of instruments that might take us even that far.

                And let me give you two examples. So this is the wonderful Floyd Romesberg,?

                and one of the things that Floyd’s been doing is he’s been playing with the basic chemistry of life.?

                So all life on this planet is made in ATCGs, the four letters of DNA.?

                All bacteria, all plants, all animals, all humans, all cows, everything else.?

                And what Floyd did is he changed out two of those base pairs, so it’s ATXY.?

                And that means that you now have a parallel system to make life, to make babies, to reproduce, to evolve,?

                that doesn’t mate with most things on Earth or in fact maybe with nothing on Earth.?

                Maybe you make plants that are immune to all bacteria. Maybe you make plants that are immune to all viruses.?

                But why is that so interesting? It means that we are not a unique solution.?

                It means you can create alternate chemistries to us that could be chemistries adaptable to a very different planet that could create life and heredity.

                What is?Floyd Romesberg known for? He developed a parallel system to make life.

                Now, we can’t even begin to?imagine?what that might look like,?but?we’re?beginning?to get?glimpses?of instruments that might take us even that far.

                The second experiment, or the other implication of this experiment, is that all of you, all life is based on 20 amino acids.?

                If you don’t substitute two amino acids, if you don’t say ATXY, if you say ATCG + XY, then you go from 20 building blocks to 172,?

                and all of a sudden you’ve got 172 building blocks of amino acids to build life-forms in very different shapes.

                The second experiment to think about is a really weird experiment that’s been taking place in China.?

                So this guy has been transplanting hundreds of mouse heads. Right

                And why is that an interesting experiment

                Well, think of the first heart transplants.?

                One of the things they used to do is they used to bring in the wife or the daughter of the donor?

                so the donee could tell the doctors, “Do you recognize this person? Do you love this person? Do you feel anything for this person?”?

                We laugh about that today.?

                We laugh because we know the heart is a muscle, but for hundreds of thousands of years, or tens of thousands of years,?

                ”I gave her my heart. She took my heart. She broke my heart.” We thought this was emotion?

                and we thought maybe emotions were transplanted with the heart. Nope.?

                So how about the brain? Two possible outcomes to this experiment.?

                If you can get a mouse that is functional, then you can see, is the new brain a blank slate

                And boy, does that have implications.?

                Second option: the new mouse recognizes Minnie Mouse.?

                The new mouse remembers what it’s afraid of, remembers how to navigate the maze,?

                and if that is true, then you can transplant memory and consciousness.?

                And then the really interesting question is, if you can transplant this, is the only input-output mechanism this down here

                Or could you transplant that consciousness into something that would be very different,?

                that would last in space, that would last tens of thousands of years, that would be a completely redesigned body that could hold consciousness for a long, long period of time?

                And let’s come back to the first question: why would you ever want to do that

                Well, I’ll tell you why. Because this is the ultimate selfie.

                This is taken from six billion miles away, and that’s Earth.?

                And that’s all of us. And if that little thing goes, all of humanity goes.?

                And the reason you want to alter the human body is because you eventually want a picture that says,?

                that’s us, and that’s us, and that’s us, because that’s the way humanity survives long-term extinction.?

                And that’s the reason?why?it turns out it’s actually?unethical?not to evolve the human body

                even though it can be scary, even though it can be challenging,

                but it’s what’s going to?allow?us to explore, live, and get to places we can’t even dream of today,

                but which our great-great-great-great- grandchildren might someday.

                Thank you very much.

                Why does?Enriquez thin transplanting?consciousness is important? It could?facilitate long-term space?travel.

                According to Enriquez?why is an ethical?to modify the human body? ?It’s essential for the survival of the human species.

                According to Enriques, if a transplanted mouse head keeps its memory …scientists might be able to transplant?consciousness.

                And that’s the reason?why?it turns out it’s actually?unethical?not to evolve the human body?even though?it can be scary, even though it can be challenging, but it’s what’s going to?allow?us to explore, live, and get to places we can’t even dream of today.

                By changing our DNA, we can create?chemistries?that are adaptable to different planets.

                If humans?are to survive long-term?extinction, they will need to live beyond the Earth.

                It means you can create alternate chemistries to us that could be chemistries adaptable to a very different planet that could create life and heredity.

                If humans?are to survive long-term?extinction, they will need to live beyond the Earth.

                Humans have long associated the heart with emotion.

                One of the things that Floyd has been doing is he’s been playing with the basic chemistry of life.

                He believes that while it may be scary, we need to modify the human body in order to survive.

                By changing our DNA, we can create chemistries?that are adaptable to different planets.

                Why would we really want to alter the human body in a fundamental way?

                With so many planets thousands of years away, humans would need to change how their bodies age.

                In a life two civilization, people can use growth hormones to change fundamental aspects of the body.

                Where is it ethical to enhance a human body and where is it not ethical to enhance a human body?

                He thinks it’s very tough to make predictions about their future role.

                All of a sudden, it’s not just one little bit, it’s all these stacked little bitsthat allow you to take little portions of it until all the portions coming together lead you to something that’s very different.

                To become an intrasolar civilization, we’re going to have to create a Life Three civilization, and that looks very different from what we’ve got here.

                Mass exinctions have happened five times on Earth, and therefore it is very likely that the human species on Earth is going to go extinct someday.

                As you’re thinking of the consequence of that, if you believe that extinctions are common and natural and normal and occur periodically, it becomes a moral imperative to diversify our species.

                The quote is saying that if you take any one of your bodies at random, drop it anywhere in the universe, drop it in space, you die.

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              l83 wd 羅茨鼓風機:東貝L83CU1壓縮機 R290制冷劑

                發貨說明:

                因為壓縮機是比較重的物品,本司所售壓縮機建議發物流,因為壓縮機發快遞中轉太多容易摔壞.發物流的話較安全,一般直達終點才卸貨.物流運費實惠(30元/臺),到達時間快.物流全國可到,需要自己提貨.

                廣東省內短途可發快遞運費拍下第二天可到達.

                其它省一律發物流自己提貨運費全國縣級可到達,需要發快遞的具體聯系客服。

                【新疆 內蒙古 西藏 青海 甘肅 寧夏】拍前請咨詢客服 。

                維修師傅注意事項:

                1,壓縮機出廠時已經按規格定量加足冷凍油,不用再添加或更換。

                2.因壞舊壓縮機的磨損產生的雜質,積存在設備系統中引起管道不通暢,所以更換壓縮機請務必用氮氣或冷媒把管道吹通,更換過濾器。

                3.檢查散熱系統,冷凝器表里是否干凈,風扇風力,啟動電容,運行電壓等是否正常,給予清理或更換,保證散熱效果。

                4.用純的制冷劑,雜質冷媒雪種會導致壓縮機壽命縮短,加注的時候量不能太多或太少。

                根據維修經驗:壓縮機裝上系統以后電流大,過熱保護等基本為系統故障,一定注意排查。

                買家須知:

                散熱不良、冷疑器 管道 過濾器 臟 堵 塞,銅管道變形 啟動電壓不正常,安裝壓縮機接錯線,電壓不正常 缺相 ,還有加氟(雪種)太多,雪種質量 系統進水 操作制冷維修技術(很多根本沒有安裝操作常識也接單搞修理配套)等原因都會 導致高壓過高使壓縮機負載,都會造成壓縮機各部件損壞或燒焦抱死;換壓縮機之前建議檢查系統是否臟堵,電壓是否正常等一些影響壓縮機壞的外在因素。還有空調全身有一百多個零部件有其他配件功能缺失等原因也會引起各方面問題 .

                我司聯系135 3567 1696 020-

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